Global Fishing Watch

90% of global fisheries are thought to be fully exploited or over-fished (UNFAO, 2014). Global Fishing Watch is a collaboration between SkyTruth, Oceana and Google, who have created this interactive tool where all trackable fishing vessels can be located on a map. It is currently in the prototype stage and it will be available to…

Which fish?

Choosing sustainable seafood and making ethical choices can make shopping a daunting task. How are you meant to know which to choose? Several handy guides have been produced to help you quickly identify the more sustainable options. These are just a few: National Geographic The National Geographic has produced an interactive ‘Seafood Decision Guide’ which…

Marine Conservation Zones

On the 30th of January 2015 only 23 of the 37 Marine Conservation Zones proposed by DEFRA for UK waters were put forward by the government for public consultation. This is frustrating as it is not the first time this has happened in the UK and proposed areas have fallen through. In 2013, 127 MCZs…

Discards – Hugh’s Fish Fight

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall highlighted the wasteful process of throwing away fish in his ‘Fish Fight’ campaign in 2010, which changed European Fisheries Policy. At the time of the campaign, 50% of the fish caught in the North Atlantic were being thrown back already dead. These fish were being discarded as the fishers did not have the…

Who looks after the high seas?

The High Seas are the vast areas of the ocean which do not fall under national jurisdiction. These areas, which make up nearly two thirds of the ocean, are effectively open to all who have the resources to access and exploit them. Very little marine protection currently exists for the High Seas, but this is…

#oceanoptimism

A big part of marine conservation is making people aware of what the problems are. If people don’t know about what’s going on, they won’t know to act or care. It’s easy to get a bit bogged down in depressing accounts of how we’re taking all the fish, littering the oceans and destroying some fragile…

Nets, pots, lines and worse…

We have become extremely efficient at extracting fish from the oceans. So much so that we are now taking them out at a faster rate than they can replenish themselves. Nearly 30% of global fish stocks were overfished in 2011(SOFIA, 2014). Bottom trawling, pair trawling, otter trawling Crab pots, scallop dredging, bottle diving Longlines, trolling,…